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Berlandiera species [Asteraceae]

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Scientific Name Berlandiera lyrata USDA PLANTS Symbol BELY
Common Name Lyreleaf Greeneyes ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 36832
Family Asteraceae (Sunflower) SEINet
Reference
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Description Habitat Dry, rocky, calcareous and sandy soils in open areas.
Plant: Perennial with erect to decumbent stems, 4 to 24 inches tall.
Leaves: Alternate, oblanceolate or spatulate in outline, or lyrate or pinnatifid; long-petiolate; up to 6 inches long.
Inflorescence: A few composite flower heads in terminal corymbs, each up to 2 inches across with ~8 yellow rays with dark red-maroon veins on the undersides; yellow or reddish disk florets with 5 lobes; blossoms emit a chocolate-like smell.
Blooming Period: Year-round.
References: "Wildflowers of Texas" by Michael Eason and SEINet.
BONAP Distribution Map

Texas Status:
Native
Scientific Name Berlandiera texana (Berlandiera betonicifolia) USDA PLANTS Symbol BEBE4
Common Name Texas Greeneyes ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 36835
Family Asteraceae (Sunflower) SEINet
Reference
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Description Habitat Dry, rocky, calcareous and sandy soils, open woodlands and edges, roadsides and valleys.
Plant: Erect perennial 2 to 4 feet tall, hairy stems usually unbranched up to the inflorescence.
Leaves: Deep green triangular to ovate, 1-1/2 to 6 inches long and 3/4 to 2-3/8 inches wide, crowded and sessile above, more evenly-spaced below and short-petiolate ; evenly-toothed edges; fine hairs on both surfaces.
Inflorescence: A few composite flower heads in terminal corymb clusters, each up to 2 inches across with 5 to 12 yellow rays with greenish veins visible on the back sides; maroon/red disk florets subtended by green phyllaries that give the disk an overall green appearance; involucre phyllaries (bracts) below rays are wide velvety and overlapping.
Blooming Period: June to September.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, "Shinners & Mahler’s Flora of North Central Texas" by Diggs, Lipscomb and O’Kennon, "Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country" by Marshall Enquist, Missouri Botanical Garden and SEINet
Note: There is some confusion about the species name with some authors using B. texana and others using B. betonicifolia. As far as I can tell, they are the same.
BONAP Distribution Map

Texas Status:
Native

© Tom Lebsack 2022