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Valerianella species [Valerianaceae]

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Scientific Name Valerianella amarella USDA PLANTS Symbol VAAM2
Common Name Hairy Cornsalad ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 35387
Family Valerianaceae (Valerian) SEINet
Reference
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Description Habitat: Rocky, calcareous soils in prairies or open or wooded hillsides and low grounds; mostly in Central Texas.
Plant: Annual 6 to 12 inches tall, single smooth, dichotomous-branched stems (i.e. branching into pairs) from base.
Leaves: Pairs of opposite, sessile leaves, 3/8 to 2-3/8 inches long; lower are obovate-spatulate; upper are oblong-obovate; entire or somewhat wavy margins.
Inflorescence: Upper stems produce flat-topped clusters about 1/2 to 3/4 inch across of 4 to 12 small white flowers about 1/8-inch across, 5 petals, 3 protruding white stamens and single, bent, protruding style.
Bloom Period: March to May.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, "Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country" by Marshall Enquist and Vascular Plants of Williamson County.
Note: The plant itself is hairless; the common name refers to the hairiness of the seed capsule (achene).
BONAP Distribution Map

Texas Status:
Native
Scientific Name Valerianella radiata USDA PLANTS Symbol VARA
Common Name Beaked Cornsalad ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 35397
Family Valerianaceae (Valerian) SEINet
Reference
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Description Habitat: Low, moist areas in Central and East Texas.
Plant: Annual 6 to 24 inches tall, stout four-sided central stem dichotomous-branched (i.e. branching into pairs) in the upper half of the plant.
Leaves: Pairs of opposite, connate leaves up to 3 inches long and 1 inch across, lower oblong-spatulate, upper oblong-ovate, hairy, entire margins.
Inflorescence: Upper stems produce flat-topped clusters about 1/2 to 3/4 inch across of 4 to 12 small white flowers about 1/8-inch across, 5 petals, 3 white, protruding stamens and one protruding stigma.
Bloom Period: March to May.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, V. woodsiana in "Wildflowers of Texas" by Geyata Ajilvsgi and www.illinoiswildflowers.info.
BONAP Distribution Map

Texas Status:
Native

© Tom Lebsack 2021