Psilostrophe species [Asteraceae]

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Scientific Name Psilostrophe tagetina USDA PLANTS Symbol PSTA
Common Name Woolly Paperflower ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 38316
Family Asteraceae (Sunflower) SEINet
Reference
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Description Habitat: Calcareous or sandy soils and saline flats, in desert scrub and grasslands.
Plant: Erect perennial 4 to 20 inches high; subshrub growing in clumps; gray-green hairy stems.
Leaves: Hairy basal leaves usually spatulate, ovate or oblanceolate, with entire or pinnately-lobed margins, 3/4 to 4 inches long; smaller, greener stem leaves alternate, linear to oblanceolate or spatulate 3/8 to 2-3/4 inches long and 1/4 inch wide.
Inflorescence: Dense clusters of showy, deep yellow flowers 1 to 1-1/2 inches across on peduncles 3/8 to 3/4-inch long; 2 to 6 rays, each 3-lobed and wider than long; 6 to 9 yellow disk florets.
Bloom Period: May to September (or later).
References: "Texas Wildflowers" by C. and L. Loughmiller and SEINet.
BONAP Distribution Map

Texas Status:
Native
Scientific Name Psilostrophe villosa (Psilostrophe tagetina var. cerifera) USDA PLANTS Symbol PSTAC
Common Name Woolly Paperflower, Plains Paperflower ITIS Taxonomic Serial No. 38317
Family Asteraceae (Sunflower) SEINet
Reference
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Description Habitat: Dry limestone, gypseous or sandy soils or caliche; open areas in grasslands, disturbed areas and roadsides.
Plant: Erect perennial 4 to 24 inches high; several to many clustered, branched stems; foliage covered with white-woolly hairs.
Leaves: Basal leaves spatulate to oblanceolate, with entire margins or with 3 to 5 lobes, 2 to 4 inches long and up to 3/4-inch wide and short-petioled; stem leaves alternate, sessile and smaller.
Inflorescence: Small dense clusters of showy, yellow flowers, each about 0.5 inch across on peduncles less than 0.2 inch long; 3 (or 4) bright yellow rays, 0.1 to 0.2 inch long, each deeply 3-lobed; usually 6 to 8 yellow disk florets; very hairy involucres.
Bloom Period: May to September.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston and Kansas Wildflowers and Grassess.
BONAP Distribution Map

Texas Status:
Native

© Tom Lebsack 2020