Brickellia species

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Scientific Name Brickellia cylindraceae USDA PLANTS Symbol
BRCY
Common Name Gravel-bar Brickellbush ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
36872
Family Asteraceae (Sunflower) SEINet Reference
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Description Habitat Dry, rocky, limestone soils in a variety of habitats in Central Texas.
Plant: Perennial or subshrub with multiple unbranched stems up to 3 feet long; hairy, glandular stems.
Leaves: Usually alternate, sometimes opposite, sessile or short petiolate, lanceolate to narrowly ovate, 1/2 to 1 inch long with blunt-toothed edges.
Inflorescence: Somewhat inconspicuous composite flower heads in racemes or panicles along branches, each blossom about 1/2-inch long with a reddish-tinged, tight, cylindrical involucre; reddish, hairy peduncles up to 5/8-inch long; no rays; 10-21 yellow disk florets with protruding stamens.
Blooming Period: August to November.
Note: Highly variable species often hard to distinguish from B. conduplicata which is found in the Big Bend area of Texas.
References: "Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country" by Marshall Enquist, "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, and SEINet.
Texas Status
Native
Scientific Name Brickellia veronicifolia USDA PLANTS Symbol
BRVE2
Common Name Veronicaleaf Brickellbush ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
36900
Family Asteraceae (Sunflower) SEINet Reference
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Description Habitat Rocky, moist areas, canyons and disturbed sites at higher elevations.
Plant: Subshrub with multiple slightly hairy, reddish branches up to 20 inches tall.
Leaves: Mostly opposite with short petioles, broadly ovate to reniform, about 1/2-inch or less across with rounded-tooth edges and blunt tip; veined, wrinkled surfaces.
Inflorescence: Leafy panicle of rayless blossoms with 18 to 33 cream to yellow disk florets; greenish, often purple-tinged phyllaries.
Blooming Period: September-October.
Note: Found in Mexico and in the US, but only in the Chisos Mountains of the Big Bend and mountains of southern New Mexico.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, "Little Big Bend" by Roy Morey and SEINet.
Texas Status
Native
Rare

© Tom Lebsack 2018