Nama species

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Scientific Name Nama havardii USDA PLANTS Symbol
NAHA
Common Name Havard Nama, Havard Fiddleleaf ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
503920
Family Boraginaceae (Forget-me-not)
SEINet Reference
Description Habitat: Open sandy, gravelly areas, often in washes.
Plant: Erect annual usually about 6 inches tall, sometimes to 16 inches tall; sturdy, hairy stems branching from base and above.
Leaves: Highly variable stem leaves and those below inflorescence, alternate, oblong to oval-spatulate and petiolate with soft hairs on both surfaces; edges may roll downward.
Inflorescence: Pink, purplish, sometimes white bell-shaped flowers 1/2 inch across with 5 rounded lobes with dark veins and white-throat; yellow stamens.
Bloom Time: March to June.
Notes: Found only in a few counties of far West Texas, mainly in Big Bend.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, “Little Big Bend” by Roy Morey and www.americansouthwest.net
Texas Status
Native
Endemic
Scientific Name Nama hispida (Nama hispidum) USDA PLANTS Symbol
NAHI
Common Name Sand Bells, Bristly Nama ITIS Taxonomic Serial No.
835388
Family Boraginaceae (Forget-me-not)
SEINet Reference.
Description Habitat: Sand and gravelly or rocky soils in various habitats; widespread in Texas.
Plant: Erect or ascending, broadly branching annual 4 to 20 inches tall; hairy stems and leaves.
Leaves: Variable leaves, alternate, linear-oblong to obovate or narrowly spatulate, 1/2 to 2-3/4 inches long and up to 1/3-inch wide; curled edges; surfaces covered with bristly hairs, glandular and non-glandular, moreso than N. havardii.
Inflorescence: Solitary in leaf axils or small terminal clusters of pink to lavender to bright purple bell-shaped flowers with yellow throats, 1/2 inch across; linear-lanceolate calyx lobes divided nearly to the base.
Bloom Period: March to July.
References: "Manual of the Vascular Plants of Texas" by Correll and Johnston, “Wildflowers of the Texas Hill Country” by Marshall Enquist and SEINet.
Texas Status
Native

Click here for Nama dichotoma.


© Tom Lebsack 2019